Faple candy


Faple = faux maple. Get it? Lulz. This actually tastes a lot more like toffee than maple syrup.

After my ritual wake-up-and-stick-my-face-in-the-fridge, all I could make out through squinty eyes was an ancient tub of maple syrup from America’s favorite drive-through fattening pen. With a sweet tooth still screaming to be sated from the meringue tease, I decided to make maple candy.

As many pre-teen girls in the early 90’s did, I read the Babysitter’s Club and Saddle Club books (mostly to find out what it was like to have friends) . Being a 36C with zits and no social skills at 11 will drive anyone to teen fiction. In one of these… can’t remember which… there was a scene where they made maple candy by drizzling a heated syrup in the snow. For some reason it stuck with me and just happens to have taken almost 20 years to try.

Faple candy

1 tub/packet of maple syrup

1 pat of butter (might work with butter spread/margarine, but I haven’t tried it)

To make it peanut brittle: add 1 or 2 packets of peanuts

  • In a small pot, melt the butter on medium/high heat
  • Add maple syrup and stir with a fork
  • Continue to stir and smooth out the bubbles
  • Somewhere between 5 and 10 minutes of cooking should yield a syrup that hardens as soon as it is dropped in ice water. It will sink to the bottom, so you’ll have to fish it out to check. Test the syrup every few minutes to find this point.
  • When the syrup passes the water/hardening test, pour it into a greased pan and allow it to cool for a few minutes. You’ll have a caramel-colored blob like this:

Let it stand for a few minutes or stick it in the fridge to expedite the process. When cool, take it out of the tray and then drop it from a few inches up. It’ll shatter like  my hopes for an acceptable LOST finale.

If you aren’t going to eat it right away,  freeze it in an airtight container for later. If left at room temperature it will start to sweat and get nasty, but some people are into that sort of thing.

I’ll give it another shot when it finally snows in Northern Virginia. I hate summer.

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